Millennials and Hunting

When you so often run into what seems to be an overwhelming tide of opposition, it can be difficult to keep a positive outlook when considering the future of hunting in this country. However, as I look more closely and consider this up-and-coming generation of Millennials I actually can see a glimmer of hope… a group that can influence a lot of change for the better.

Now, I know what you’re likely thinking: “I’ve seen you in photos on social media. Aren’t you a Millennial?” No, I’m not… and I willfight you. I was born in that strange stretch of years where I’m not Gen-X, but I have a lot of trouble identifying with those baked solid into the center of this Millennial generation… the non-existent Gen-Y.

But, I digress… Check out these articles by Connor McKibbin over at NRA Family on why Millennials should start hunting and how to introduce Millennials to hunting.


NRA Family: Why Millennials Should Try Hunting

by Connor McKibbin

As much as I hate being lumped in with the group, at 25, I am undoubtedly a “Millennial.” This moniker isn’t a pleasant one because other groups (Generation X, Generation Y and the Baby Boomers) have negative perceptions of Millennials. We’re considered lazy and entitled, and these traits have sadly become our defining characteristics. We want the respect of these people, as they’re our bosses, teachers, politicians and parents. To start reframing our image, we need to use previous generations’ rites of passage to prove that what they did is not beyond us. One of these is hunting. Here’s why we should give it a try—even though many of our peers disdain it.

NRA Family: Millennial to Millennial: Talking About Hunting

by Connor McKibbin

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If you’re a hunting Millennial like me, you probably love the sport and see all the benefits that come with it (if you don’t, then catch up to the times). And if that’s the case, you have very few people you can talk to about the hobby, seeing as our generation isn’t the most hunting-friendly group to try and spark a conversation with. But without expanding our horizons, we will see the collapse of hunting altogether. That means, whether we want to or not, we need to rid the average hipster/hipstress of their disillusionment of hunting, because ignorance definitely isn’t bliss, especially when it comes to hunting. But how do we begin the talk, let alone help others walk the walk? Greek philosophy can actually lend a hand here (never thought I’d use this after college, yet, here I am) in persuading your average non-hunting friend to switch sides. With these three ideas, you might not strike out, and hopefully you’ll be surprised how soon someone will become a lifelong hunting—or at the very least, shooting—buddy. The best way to do this? Start with the basics, which means…
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