Ep 31 – Hunting Advice and Inspiration from Jim Shockey



Summary

Living Country in the City sits down with Jim Shockey to talk about being a born-and-raised hunter, learning to enjoy every aspect of the hunt, his personal record for death threats, combating hate towards hunters, his personal heroes and inspirations for hunting, redefining the media’s hateful caricatures of hunters and what he hopes for his personal legacy.

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Transcription

Jim
 Basically I’ve hunted all over the world countries like Pakistan, Iran, Asia Beijing. I grew up eating meat if we didn’t… If my dad didn’t get a moose every fall, then we didn’t have meat for the winter. He wanted the ambulance to at the stop at the sporting store so he could get his white tail license, that’s a true story; 86 years old. I know how we’ve been vilified and marginalized by the mainstream press you know turned into these ugly character creatures. My personal 24-hour record for death threats is 88. Those fields of Tofu that was formally habitat for wildlife and now it’s a modern culture, you’re killing our wildlife by being a vegetarian just as much as a hunter when he kills a deer. But I’ve made a positive influence on the non-hunting public about what hunters are? and what hunting is then I would be overjoyed.

Living Country in the City
 Hi, this is Jim Shockey, and you’re listening to living country in the city, episode number 31. Y’all ready for your dose of flyover state spirit, straight from the concrete jungle, well put down your latte and pull on your boots. It’s time for living country in the city. Hey all thank you for tuning in for episode 31 of living country in the city. You know it’s been a crazy couple of weeks with the day job and some events and generally prepping for my. So i really like to apologize for going so long without releasing a new episode. I do my best to release on a regular weekly schedule but as you all know life sometimes tends to get in the way, but hopefully you’ll agree with me that your patience is being ritually rewarded with this episode. I have to say that while I look forward to each and every guest i get to speak with and learn from on this podcast, there is very few that get me quite as excited as today’s guest.  He is one of the very first personalities to really inspire me to truly be in my journey in the outdoors and hunting and I know he’s had a similar very profound effect on hundreds if not thousands of other folks out there. I’m super excited to get started so let’s not waste any more time. Jim thanks for hoping on the call.

Jim
 Well that’s my pleasure thanks for having me.

Living Country in the City
 So my podcast is geared towards new hunters, people kind of new to the outdoors. I find it still a little bit hard to believe that anyone hasn’t heard of Jim Shockey, but for those who may not quite be in the know could you maybe just give me a little bit of a background on kind of your history with hunting and the outdoors.

Jim
 
Sure. I actually started, obviously I grew up hunting I grew up hunting in Saskatchewan in Canada but professionally I wrote my first hunting article back in 1984. It was an archery article for a magazine called Bow Bender magazine. I got $42 for that first article way back then and I’ve basically graduated from being an outdoor writer to being on outdoor televisioner. I grew up in Canada and the Yukon was that about a territory of 7,000,000 square acres not a single road, or house, or person living in there was just a remote wilderness and Vancouver Island for black bears. So for certainty it was a big territory of Saskatchewan and I could not wait till adventures. So I’ve been in this industry a long time, I’ve hunted all over the world probably 50 different countries just anywhere where it’s legal to hunt. I’ve hunted in some of the places many times including countries like Pakistan, Iran, China, Russia and all through West Africa; Liberia, Congo, Ghana and most of the Africa countries in fact I just got back from Somalia for a mount hunting there. So basically I’ve hunted all over the world in a professional hunter slash. Been a guide for 25years and writing or on television for 33years.

Living Country in the City
 So pretty much when it comes to hunting you can say you’ve run the game and chased just about everything then?

Jim
 Well, yeah you can say I have tried to chase just about everything. It’s been successful getting those animals but yeah I’ve pretty much tried to chase everything.

Living Country in the City
 So with all of these countries and all of these animals you’ve chased is there a favorite I have to ask?

Jim
 Yeah there is. I’m heading up to the Yukon pretty quick. For a last Yukon moose and to me the last Yukon moose during the run where they live is that’s my favorite big game animal to hunt in the world. They are just magnificent animals and always live in a remote area. Obviously the largest this is the largest big game animal in the world but also they taste great. I grew up eating meat. If my dad didn’t get a moose every fall then we dint have meat for the winter. We lived on there was no going out buying a cow; I didn’t even know you could do that until I was quite a bit old. We lived in a trailer park actually till i was six years old. So for me moose is my favorite big game animal but if you change the question just slightly and said,” If you could only hunt one more animal for the rest of your life one more species what would it be?” That wouldn’t be moose it would be white tail deer. That’s a game grew up hunting white tail deer and I got my first white long before i got my first white moose. I would love to hunt white tail deer till the day I die God willing. My father passed away three years ago and he was 86 when he took his last white tail deer, 85 actually when he took his last white tail deer just about to be 86 and just about to enter the white tail season he was 85 years when he passed away. In fact just on his way to the hospital he wanted the ambulance to stop at the sporting store so he could get his white tail license on his way to hospital and that’s a true story; 86 years old. He was just about 86 and I would love to be in that same boat, hunting till the day I die for white tail deer. So slight variation on that favorite big game animal question.

Living Country in the City
 Well, stories like that definitely I think explain why you’re the hunter you are. I can imagine why you are the man who has gone hunting with a father like that how could you not be.

Jim
 
You know it’s funny. He is the one that taught me how to hunt obviously my father was very important to me in that regard but he was not the same of type of hunter I was. Anybody watched the two of us over the years they all know that he was a meat hunter. So to him make that soup and he would turn down the biggest waiting for the fattest. That’s all he cared about. And so he was an interesting guy and like I said we had some discussion about what hunting was all about many times, so he was meat hunting and I was for the experience of a better hunt. For him the shorter the hunt the sooner you get back to work and have meat in the freezer, the better the hunt was.

Living Country in the City
 I’m getting ready to go on my very first hunt. I’m definitely challenging myself I’m doing bad country DIY archery elk hunt in about three weeks. First time ever out in that country first time ever hunting so to speak and I've got so much going on in my head I’m not sure I wanna go out for the meat, I wanna go out for the experience, I also wouldn’t mind taking a nice trophy. But it’s hard to say what I’m looking forward to the most whether it’s filling that freezer or getting to take that gripping grin photo or just being out there for ten days and in a bad country. Definitely there is a lot going on in my brain when it comes to this.

Jim
 
Yeah I can imagine wow that’s a huge challenge to go back packing for elk. And archery you said as well?

Living Country in the City
 Yeah archery hunt

Jim
 Holy smokes, let’s just say you are up for a big challenge and really as long as you’re going with understanding that there are those different components to hunt. A lot of people focus on the kill in the public press nowadays that’s what they focus on when they talk about hunters. All we care about is the kill and they don’t have like you said gripping and then they use that as an example and say this is what hunters are; this is all they care about. You said the other components…Part of the other components ten days in the outdoors. That’s fantastic, you could go and just camp and cannot be hunting but then. You’re enjoying but it’s kind of part of being. Not the part we were meant to do as humans from way back it’s what we were designed to do and how we survived. So when you have a hunting component now you’re camping with a purpose. So yes you’re getting all those elements of camping would give somebody that doesn’t hunt would enjoy. Some was but your also in the fact that, if you find out now you can actually try and stop them legally and test your skills against their skills so you’re not just out there going, ”ooh this is beautiful let’s take a picture.” Now you’re trying to speak with a bow and arrow which is a primitive way and then if you are successful so you got all those components which are all part of the hunting. And if you’re successful then you’re gonna be able to fill your freezer organic meat available. Game meat is the best meat you can eat and it’s a mixture of vegetarian. So there is another component to hunting and then you get into the different ways you can prepare it to cook it. And to make share with your friends this is what we did. We brought first for our family then for the members of our local community, village then the tribe then the greater clan and eventually for the country we all benefit when the hunters are successful. So you are actually taking part in something that is so deeply satisfying. If you don’t hunt you don’t understand that. You actually have a relationship with meat unlike meat you bought who knows I don’t know how many different animals are mixed in there. There is no relationship with the food you’re eating. So when you re hunting you have that relationship it means something every meal means something. There is something lacking in our world today. These are components you understand they are wonderful but they don’t determine the success of the hunt, the kill doesn’t what does is all those other factors. The kill is just a tiny little slice of the hunting pie. Go out there to enjoy all of that. If you’re fortunate enough to get a great day one and get to take your gripping grin picture then fantastic. That’s not ego that’s a memory of an incredible accomplishment that  we as hunters we painted on caves originally now we take pictures it’s a symbolic gesture and memory. So I’m kind of a so far ship wanna, but going on your first hunt that’s incredible. I think it’s fantastic I’d love to hear how you do. It’s a wonder that me and my thousands of hunts I still feel, so what you’re feeling right now is what I feel when I prepare to go to the Yukon to live up there for a month in the wild lands. It never goes away as a hunter it’s a beautiful feeling that everybody recognizes in a deep way and that’s what you’re feeling right now. Just go out and enjoy every bit, every step and every experience and every breath in the wild lands it doesn’t get better than that.

Living Country in the City
 I’m at the point now where I’ve kind of done the majority of my prep work. I’ve gone through my gear and I’ve kinda organized it. I’m finishing all my scouting online that I can do and I’ve had some generous really generous people reach out to me and share information like significant amounts of information that really normally as hunters we’d normally keep close to the heart. Just some very generous people I think that are almost more excited for me than I am for myself but it’s the point where I don’t have other than practicing my shooting and continue practice on carrying my pack and things like that. I don’t have a ton of planning to do and so I’m starting to get really anxious so I’m not really sure how I’m gonna make it through these next three weeks at work.

Jim
What I do…what i just did this morning I just came back from hiking over the mountain, over the water and over the mountain again and back home. It’s about a five mile hike it’s just about maybe 1500 tall. What it does is sort of knock down some of that anticipation and excitement. It  makes me slow down a little bit it just wait so exercise is always a good way to prepare waiting point and you know you can’t do much I mean you can practice your bow too that’s always fun.

Living Country in the City
 I definitely need plenty of that.

Jim
 [laughs] we all do

Living Country in the City
 I do hikes about every other day there is not a ton of places that are close that I can get away with before I head over to the office. Today was actually exciting and I was a little frustrating eclipse I woke up to an observatory, it was a bit packed a couple of hundred people up there.  So i was a little frustrated but on my way down, normally I see some squirrels lizards and that’s it and maybe the occasional jack rabbit because I’m in the middle of Los Angeles I should clarify that. But on my way down I saw two does run across the trail. For a lot of folks who live out of the country that’s just what it is everyday but for me and for this particular trail you don’t just see that ever and to see two of them pop out, I don’t know if I wanna call it a good omen, it was just very encouraging.

Jim
 Well of course it’s a good omen. Well think of it about 10,000 years your ancestors a deer crossed in front of them you think they wouldn’t put some deeply spiritual meeting on that. I think you’re in for a wonderful hunt because of all that.

Living Country in the City
 Well I’m definitely gonna take it that way one way or another. So, when you first started hunting obviously there wasn’t this giant social media presence. I’m sure hunting was spread word about hunting and word about hunting was spread more through newspapers and magazines, things like that and TV shows. As you were growing up hunting who were some of the people or what were some of the things that inspired you as a hunter?

Jim
 
I was 10 years old when I read a book called Hunter by J.A Hunter. He was a wildlife conservation officer in Kenya back in the 30s 40s. I read his book when I was in grade five; I read it three times in a row and usually during this rush art class which sent me to the detention reading it in front of the principal’s office which gave me more time to read my book. That was the kind of things that inspired me. Jim Cobber the Man Eaters of Kokomo of jumbo or whatever it was in India. There is not a book that did not inspire me. The contemporary writers at that time like Jack O’Conner. My father was more armored with Jack’s writing and what Jack said. My father loved the fact that he said that 270 any North American big game species to sell in Winchester. I never really bided to that even way back when I was, needed something bigger, bigger was better but Jack O’Conner definitely was an influence back in those days. Into a more contemporary time Jim Zumbo, he was a big influence on me as well and even Kate Boddington at the time he was not an influence but an inspiration even Larry Whiteshore these guys are still going on till today, still involved with the industry. I remember the first time I walked into a room I was like wowed meeting my heroes. I literally walked up to Jim Zumbo I was like,” Jim Zumbo you’re my hero.” There is kinda a way I’m hoping they are listening. I was influenced by all of them but I really was more influenced by the early writers the indenture writers. The guys that lived during that period that when the wildlife conservation was just coming in to the forefront. That was more of my inspiration for what I am today and what I’ve done in my life.

Living Country in the City
 Plant that seed as we were kind of talking before the podcast started you have planted the seed in many other people as well. We were talking before you are one of the people that inspired me to be interested in hunting. Of course Eva as well she inspired me a lot to pick up the bow. You’ve taken this seed that was planted years and years ago and you have spread this passion for hunting to…I mean it has to be thousands and thousands of people.

Jim
 
HopefullyI’m often asked what I’d like my legacy to be in the outdoor world and if I would rest in peace for eternity if my legacy was that they’d say that I made a positive influence on the non-hunting  public about what hunters are and what hunting is, then I would be overjoyed, I would say great that’s a life well spent because I know what it means to us who hunt and I know how we’ve been vilified and marginalized by the main stream press and turned into these ugly character creatures. I find it so sad, I’ve been in four different United States cities in the last seven days doing appearances time after time after time you meet this wonderful  people who have families and  they live in the outdoors yes they are not as urbanized and they don’t have the same philosophy as the urban people but they live the same lives, you can’t judge them from ivory tower in downtown New York City or Los Angeles where you are and look at these people and say they are buffoons or they are in any way less sophisticated or less world evicted give me a break. These people have values that are the very values that these two big countries Canada and United states were built for family, honor , tradition, respect and I see it over and over again and yet you’ll never see that brought up in the main stream press, they would rather have us look like low sensibility goons and that’s just it. I just find it such a sad thing when anyone writes about hunters that way. Sure we’ve got an element that isn’t as respectful with the law but those are called poachers they are not hunters. Most hunters have wonderful for the animals they are after and respect and love for those animals. They are just not necessary the best  people at articulating those feelings, they feel it but they can’t talk about it or can’t explain it to somebody and like I said until somebody goes and experiences it themselves they can never understand it, it’s impossible. How do you explain something that’s spiritual, you can’t explain you can have it but only if you have it. So as I said back to your question I would love my legacy to be that I made a positive influence on the impression of prospective hunting and hunters.

Living Country in the City
 I mean I definitely say you have… If you haven’t already achieved that you’ve made incredible strides in that direction just because you present it in just such a fashion that’s respectful and just honest and straight forward. You don’t damn it down to like hide things from the public it is what it is but you do it in such a respectful way you can’t really…you can’t walk away from it and say this is a bad guy this is an evil person. There will always be people, over the top people that will say stuff like that.

Jim
 Just for the record my personal death threats is 88 in 24hours. I appreciate what you’re saying but there is people out there their ideology is so closed minded with zero tolerance. I laugh… I don’t laugh I’m saddened by these people they believe so deeply in what they are saying they just can’t have respect for anybody’s else’s way of life. I think it’s a loss for them, I respect what they want and so do all hunters. I mean we respect someone who wants to be a vegetarian that’s fantastic I love it but don’t think that at that point you are holier than thou and you don’t kill animals. Those fields of Tofu I’m being a little here being a little here but they, those Tofu fields that was formally habitat for wildlife and now it’s a modern culture, you’re killing our wildlife by being a vegetarian just as a hunter kills a deer. The difference is that with the hunter there is no hypocrisy the hunter knows that you’ve killed a deer. I’m saddened that these people think that somehow hunting is an ugly blood score that’s so far from the truth. That’s focusing on the moment of the kill and believe me those hamburgers that they are eating and those steak that they are eating those were living breathing animals at one point that chicken is too so are those crabs. And you can’t tell me that those fried you are having in a fancy restaurant that was a breathing animal. It’s still an animal with a life and to think any less of that animal is hypocrisy. I’m just saddened when I see people like that they are so full minded and have zero tolerance to anybody’s point of view. That’s not what hunters are about never have been.

Living Country in the City
 
I feel like people’s ideology or even but when somebody thinks that’s death threats are an appropriate response to at some point I understand that they are passionate but   at some point your ideology just becomes so twisted. It is a sad thing.

Jim
 
Yeah, It’s a sad commentary on a ‘civilized world’. Like you said twisted is a great word. It is a perfect way to describe it because the intentions are pure but once they twist it up like that it’s impossible to see anything other than the world and like you said death threats are even what will that ever accomplish. I don’t know maybe there are 7.5 billion of us in the world you put too many rats into a cage they start eating each other. So maybe it’s more of how many of human beings in this world. Who knows? It takes you and myself to figure that out.

Living Country in the City
 
Is there anyone out in the industry right now also presents. Who do you look at and say they do an incredible job of presenting this whole picture of hunting. Are there other people you would say provide influence to the non-hunting community as far as hunting goes?

Jim
 I think there is people that are really influencing segments of the population I think of the Sam Hans with his physical fitness. He’s reaching out to those people that are into that. I can’t do 500 pushups and nor do I need to, to climb up the mount, but I don’t reach out to those people that Sam reaches. So he reaches a segment. Steve Rinella is a great young man. He reaches out to the people about the meat part of hunting, with orientation towards the spiritual side I wouldn’t say that Steve doesn’t have a world’s vision of what hunting is I think he is big enough the big picture but I think he is really doing a great job in his sort of meat world. I think that’s his as a meat eater he is doing. Guys like Joe Woger fantastic ambassador for hunting. Joe is a bright man he is a great man 2 million instagram followers he is an archer he is like a sponge when he is asking questions about hunting he wants know he wants to see the bigger picture he doesn’t just want to represent one small part of it. So he is making a great influence on the public. Eva Shockey my own daughter, Eva is doing… I think she is one of the greatest ambassadors we have, she’s young, beautiful, articulate, well-educated she has lived the life of a hunter. She wasn’t until she was 21 now she has embraced it and understands it. She represents hunting better in the main stream than almost any of us. They wanna talk to somebody like her she is a threat to the animal writers. People like to paint us as and the main stream press would like to have us characterized you know  she is not and so she is somebody that has the opportunity to reach out to the main stream public and do a great job with. There are a great number of ambassadors out there that are reaching out outside and I think everybody puts a celebrity monitor on it maybe a little sobriety. I think everybody is trying in their own way to represent hunting in the best way they can. I don’t know if everybody is reaching the world. I’m hoping that we get a champion somebody that will be doing that for us. I think that there are people there are high profile people that are afraid of the backlash, the brutal bullying. So they don’t wanna stand up and say was right. There are some captains of industry that are hunters that are starting to put some dollars where their believes are. Slowly but surely we are seeing this. How you can reach around the world in minutes and go viral so that a message can be mutated in some ugly, horrible misinformation. These guys are afraid of that bullying online; they try and bully everybody to their point of view. It’s not right but it is what it is welcome to the water world.

Living Country in the City
 
You know they said these hateful people play the long game they are patient and they are willing to sit and chase away people’s will power keep away at peoples they will find out who supports you and go up against them too. As hunters we have to be ready for that I think and understand it’s gonna be a drawn out thing it’s not gonna be a quick Facebook post. They are gonna play the long game so we have to be prepared to do that as well.

Jim
 Yeah, as hunters are really still every distance. Hardly do we battle is just not our thing we live and let live that wouldn’t be twisted around because we have a relationship with the food we eat, we don’t hide from it, we don’t run from it we respect it. We are not going anywhere hunters have been around than vegetarians or vegans whatever they call themselves and we will be around a long after. So the long game is fine, it may seem for the long game they are not really. It’s one of those little aggravations in time and they came in the cold back in the 60s follow power move on to have that point of view that philosophy is still popular but it’s not really a long game if you look at it over our generations. Its here it’s now in the end it will be proven that hunting is a great conservation tool. I have tittle for the youngest generation coming now fake press fake meat whatever they are calling it now. And they are gonna want to know the truth. So whatever generations gonna wanna know what’s the truth, okay that’s the truth and great let’s use this truth to protect the wildlife. So I have hopes for the youngest generation I’m a little bit saddened by the elements in this generation they are so negative about everything. There is rosy spots around the world on conservationism it works because of hunting so we are winning a lot of battles out there we are just not able to tell the world about it very easily because we don’t unfold the press.

Living Country in the City
 On that note let’s take a quick moment to hear a word from one of my partners.  Alright y’all we all know it’s possible to get in to the bad country and take back that big bull with a set of and a warm out tent let’s face it. Quality gear can often make the difference between checking out early, do the shear misery and pushing through just a little bit further to find success but all these gear can start to add up and that’s why I’d recommend shopping at Black Ovis they carry high performance hunting gears from all the top brands like Vortex, Crispy, Sitka, Fast Light, Mountain Ops and Stone Glatcher often at a nicely discounted rate. I’m yet to find anywhere that offers a more reasonable price plus their shipping is free and their customer service is unmatched. Additionally by making the choice to shop at Black Ovis you are supporting the company that’s involved in and gives back to the hunting community. It’s where I do all my gear shopping and whether you’re just looking to replace a few items or build out a brand new kit Black Ovis is the one stop shop for super solid hunting gear. Additionally you can help support Living country in the city by doing all your gear shopping at Black Ovis. Visit livingcountryinthecity.com/blackovis market link whenever you do your shopping. So what can we expect from Jim Shockey this year? What should we be looking out for?

Jim
 Lots of social media posts with our two grandchildren. That’s big news in our lives, we have new grandchildren. Baby adventure for a boy and a little girl going to be spending a lot more time in North America and a lot of our television shows moving forward after the 19s to 20s will be 2019 and 2020 will be North America orientated. So I wanna explore North America I’ve hunted literally as I said everywhere around the world everything you can hunt. Now I get to refocus on North America there are some amazing hunts in North America the grass is always greener. Yesterday in Mississippi they were hunting for stuffing turtles the point is those are dinosaurs and that is one of the coolest hunts ever so I wanna go hunt in nutria I’ve never hunted in nutria in the east coast with archery bow hunt.so I mean there is so many alligators I believe there is a place so these are things I wanna explore I’ve got the alligator space covered here in North America for the next couple of years for sure so you will see a lot more of that. I got the outer space covered but I got the t-shirt for this season ready. I wanna look North America now for the next few years.

Living Country in the City
 well that’s super exciting and
I will definitely keep an eye for that. as we are winding down is always like to end with a little geared towards new hunters who are considering getting in the outdoors or possibly folks like myself who grew up in the city and wanted to be involved in hunting in the outdoors but maybe think it’s a little intimidating or there is too much to learn. what kind or words of wisdom would you give someone in that position?

Jim
 the same advice that I got when I went out for the first time. Take it one step at a time and don’t think that you are gonna be an accomplished skillful hunter on your first time. The first hunt is archery and that is advanced level hunting. I’d say what it is, is you are willing to challenge yourself and really to the end degree. But here is the thing by doing what you’re doing take one step at a time and you will certainly end up there eventually. With a bow or whatever you’re after standing there with an archery distance but it takes time and it takes one step at a time and never ever give up the quest. Know that that journey along the way that’s what hunting is, with every single step you are learning to become a better hunter, you are becoming a better hunter. Just set goals that are realistic for your skills set. If you are an accomplished archer that’s taken an elk set a goal it wouldn’t be more difficult to sneak up on an animal. But if you have never taken an elk before set a goal and know your skills ahead of time you can hit a target at 80m yards the size of a  before you ever head onto the field. There is one step, practice your calling just work on the skills just one step at a time. And when you’re closer towards that happen and  don’t set a goal it’s not a don’t set a goal like that, I would join 10 days .so set goals that are reasonable for your skill level and take it one step at a time and appreciate every breath of fresh air is  making you stronger healthier, one more step towards being in better health and then if you are fortunate enough to get one of those animals show it respect it’s not a time to just go yahoo it’s not about that at all. Show reverence for it and understand that animal died so you can Iive. You can live another animal is gonna have to die understand this incredible majestic thing that you’ve taken part in and understand how deeply spiritual it is. Feel that moment then you’ll become a hunter at that point one step at a time and you’ll end up that incredible moment all hunters hope for when they succeed in getting that animal.

Living Country in the City
 Wow I’m a little bit speechless after that I could not imagine a better way to end this podcast. Jim thank you so much for willing and taking the time outside your busy schedule to hop on the line with me today. If people wanted to follow you online where is the best place to check out the grandchild pictures?

Jim
 I’m still on Facebook and instagram as well. So those are the two best places to follow what we are doing behind the scenes on a day to day basis.

Living Country in the City
 And it’s Jim Shockey on both of those?

Jim
 Yes you bet

Living Country in the City
 Alrighty. Well thanks again for hoping on the line, I know you are all anxious to get on the boat so I’ll let you go but thank you so much.

Jim
 There are some prawn traps I gotta go pull. We are gonna eat like kings tonight.

Living Country in the City
 
I’m a little jealous right now thanks Jim.

Jim
 Good luck on your hunt.

Living Country in the City
 I appreciate. Alright y’all that will do it for episode 31 of Living Country in the city. I hope you all enjoyed that one as much as I did I got a lot out of it so hope you all did too. Make sure you give Jim a follow online and check out all his adventures this year as well as the grand baby photos. You can find links to all those pages as well as any pages we talked about in the show notes page at livingcountryinthecity.com/32. Now if you haven’t yet please take a moment to subscribe to the show and if you’ve enjoyed what you’re listening to I’d really appreciate if you left me an honest review or rating on iTunes or stitcher it really helps the podcast grow and help some continue to get awesome folks on to talk with and learn from. Good luck with the all seasons this year and I’ll talk to you soon but in the meant time keep it Living Country y’all.

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